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Passion, fire, love, hate, desire, inspiration – they’re all portrayed in your writing whether they’re intended or not. You don’t even have to directly write about them in order to have your reader read them. They can in fact become apparent in writing based on any topic, plot or genre and any length or style. But how can I transfer these sorts of things over to my reader without writing about them? Well my friend, the answer is simple. These things aren’t passed on to your reader through words, but more so, the way in which the words are written.

The ways in which they are connected, how they flow, the pace of them, the slowness of them, the order of them, the tone of them – the very life and soul of them! It is how you write that gets these things across, not what you write.

It’s just as in any sort of passion in life: if you aren’t doing it with your heart and soul, you aren’t really that passionate about it. So with writing, if you aren’t spilling the contents of your heart out onto the pages and painting a portrait of your soul with words, you aren’t actually writing. I’m afraid what you’re doing, is simply putting words onto paper or a screen. And let me tell you, in writing, there is way more to it than that.

I had a drama teacher back in my school days (Miss Romartinez was her name – I’ll never forget her!) who used to tell me about the ‘magic if’. It was a rule in stage acting but I think it can be applied here too. It essentially goes like this: if you don’t believe in your character, the audience have no chance. I shall change it to fit to writing: if you don’t believe in your words, the reader will have no chance. And it is true. Have you ever tried writing something that you aren’t all that crazy about? Like maybe an article on a topic that someone else chose or a type of genre that you wouldn’t usually write or ever read in? It’s difficult to do so and even more difficult to do so convincingly.

So when writing, I believe that it is crucial to make sure that you are writing from the heart and soul. Making sure that you include little pieces of yourself on every page. After all, that is what writing is, isn’t it? Living, experiencing, feeling – and then transcribing those exact things, which results in telling much more compelling stories or writing intensely heartfelt poetry. It just makes sense. You can only truly en-capture feelings in your writing that you have actually truly felt. The things that you hold in your heart are the very things that give you your own individual voice.

Someone who has experienced pain their entire life and holds pain in their heart, will have a tone that evokes and displays this exact emotion. Someone who has been surrounded by eternal happiness, will have a tone that will make you smile with every other sentence. These things are intangible. It wouldn’t matter if they were writing about a fictitious series of deaths which take place in the boroughs of New York or a follow-along guide on how to make a chicken pot pie – the tone, the writers individual voice (if properly developed of course), will always be there. Will always remain the same.

So bear this in mind the next time you sit down to write, and ask yourself if you are giving your work all that you can. You must look deep within yourself, into all of the experiences, hardships, turmoil, happiness, excitement – everything! Delve deep into it all and let it spill out onto those pages. Only then will you truly be able to write something entirely captivating. Something which does exactly what writing is supposed to do: make the reader feel. And mainly: to help them escape from the often torturous real world, plunging them deep into a world of fiction – where they can overlook the hardships of others and learn from them, without having to endure the pain which comes with it.

And giving a reader that escape, certainly makes for some:

Happy writing!